The trade routes that threaten biodiversity

Watch the Nature video about Nature Ecology & Evolution's paper 'Identifying species threat hotspots from global supply chains'.

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Jan 04, 2017
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One of the major threats to biodiversity worldwide is international trade. The production of goods for export often involves logging, mining, fishing or other activities that can damage natural habitats. To figure out where the drive for these goods is coming from, researchers traced the production of goods in one country to consumers in another. The maps in this video show how consumers in the US and Japan are endangering animal species in 'threat hotspots' around the world.

You can read the full Nature Ecology & Evolution paper here.

Go to the profile of Patrick Goymer

Patrick Goymer

Chief Editor, Nature Ecology & Evolution

Patrick joined Nature Publishing Group in 2005 as an Assistant Editor at Nature Reviews Genetics and Nature Reviews Cancer. In 2008 he moved to Nature, where he served as Senior Editor covering ecology and evolution, before becoming Chief Editor of Nature Ecology & Evolution in 2016. He has handled primary manuscripts and review articles across the entire breadth of ecology and evolution, as well as advising and writing for other sections of Nature. Patrick has a degree in genetics from the University of Cambridge, did his DPhil in experimental evolution in Paul Rainey’s lab at the University of Oxford, and did postdoctoral work on evolutionary and ecological genetics in Linda Partridge’s lab at University College London in association with Charles Godfray’s lab at Imperial College London.

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